Let’s Talk Placenta

Placenta Encapsulation

Placenta Encapsulation

This Hippy Sh*t

Before I had Oscar I was clueless about the placenta… as I was with EVERYTHING surrounding birth… and babies… and parenthood (and the list goes on). But no one talks about the placenta, do they? And I suppose it’s not that important is it? It’s only the organ that provides your growing baby with everything it needs to thrive – from oxygen to nutrients… but we don’t mention it. It’s just a kind of yucky word, a thing no one really talks about. A bit of an afterthought!

I watched a documentary when I was pregnant with Oscar all about “alternative births”. One woman who was having no medical observations during her pregnancy, including scans and would give birth at home on a boat if I remember right and another was going to birth in a lake like a mermaid I think. Another woman was having a Lotus Birth which is the practice of leaving the umbilical cord uncut after birth so that the baby is left attached to the placenta – she was carrying it around in a wee bag and sprinkling it with rose petals – “this shit is a bit hippy” I thought “but each to their own”. Then there was a girl that was choosing to “ingest her placenta” in the form of a smoothie which didn’t sound that ‘out there’ she spoke about what she believed would be the benefits and how it was only one little drink so why not… It got me thinking, and the more I thought about it, the more I came round to the idea. This was followed by some Googling and reading some personal accounts of women that had done it and research that surrounded the practice. Some people had cooked it, some had drank it, some had had it encapsulated and some buried it in their garden with a tree or plant – it was interesting! Continue reading

Seven Days Of Scout – From Bump to Babe

In theatre
Bump to Baby
39 weeks vs 40 weeks

“Just when you think you know love, something little comes along to remind you just how big it really is”

A few weeks ago I wrote a post centred around my positive birth experience with Oscar. When I tried to put it all together, I realised just how much of the detail I’d forgotten. Caught up in a haze of nerves & excitement on the day the details we remember are sketchy, and over time have been forgotten. So I decided to make note of Scout’s birth story early on, and not wait nearly two and a half years…!

In my last post, I shared my hopes for our second little ones elective c-section and well, on 11th January 2018, exactly 29 months to the day on from Oscar’s Birthday our second baby entered the world in the most lovely, calm and magical way – and our hearts instantly doubled in size. Continue reading

Looking Forward to Another Positive Birth…

It’s coming round quick…

Well here’s a crazy thought – this time next month it’s *very* possible that we’ll have a new wee baby in our lives. A brand new (hopefully cute) sleep thief…

In preparation for seeing our Consultant this week to discuss our birth choices, I’ve been thinking a lot about my previous positive birth experience of having had a elective c-section with Oscar (along with the inevitable off hand comments that often follow such a birth *eye roll*) and I’m looking ahead to doing it all over again…

Bum Down Baby

For my entire pregnancy Oscar was always head up, bum down, the wrong way, breech. We were always assured he’d “probably correct himself” but as the weeks drew in towards his due date it was become less and less likely, especially as he started to run out of room. Regardless, we followed the advice and I spent a lot of my spare time at home in the downward dog position craning my head up to see the telly – very dignified, and it didn’t work.

Having been consultant led throughout my pregnancy, we were sat down once more at around 36ish weeks to discuss our options. We were offered an External Cephalic Version (ECV), this is when pressure is applied on your abdomen in an attempt to assist the baby in a somersault in the womb to lie head down. We declined this procedure based on a number of factors, including it’s rather low success rate.

Continue reading